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An Interrelated Earth-Moon System


A theory that can satisfactorily explain the origin of the Earth and Moon pair must somehow account for their interrelated orbital rates


The interface of days, months, and years

A mindless formation of the Earth and Moon pair seems improbable in the regard that the spin and orbital movements appear to be remarkably interrelated. Essentially, it is possible to interpret that the spin and orbital rates do all interface together to divide the time stream into a functional arrangement.

Interrelated time design can be interpreted because the rate of the solar year can so perfectly be represented in time segments of the 24-hour day (the solar-day cycle). Likewise, the rate of the solar year can exactly be represented in time segments defined by the orbital movement of the Moon.

The most logical conclusion for an interface between the spin and orbital movements is that the mechanical makeup of the Earth and Moon has resulted from creation processes, mindfully conducted.

As a consequence of the interaction of the spin-orbital movements, a resident of the Earth perceives time differently than time would be perceived somewhere else--as in space. The good news here seems to be that each resident of this rotating Earth is alive in a time stream that--in all probability--has been functionally arranged.

Interfacing lunisolar cycles

It's easy to recognize that the spin and orbital movements inherently divide the time stream into equally metered divisions. For example, the Earth rotates once every 24 hours, the Moon passes through one synodic revolution every 29.53059 days (on the average), and the Earth passes through one Tropical Year every 365.24219 days.

While these respective cycles might superficially appear to be very unrelated, a degree of interrelatedness can be interpreted from out of these seemingly disjointed time cycles.

Subsequent sections and accompanying articles will then attempt to show that time cycles generated by the Earth and Moon can be correlated to a time grid that appears to be intelligently arranged.


Interrelated time design

An interpretation of interrleated time design seems satisfactory based upon the phase rate of the Moon. The quarter-phase rate of the Moon inherently returns in interface with the rate of the tropical year (which is 365.24219 days).

Note that each synodic revolution of the Moon passes through four distinct quarter phases--as follows:
For the purposes of presenting a clear analysis, the quarter-phase cycle of the Moon will hereafer be refered to as the lunar-week cycle. Likewise, the time span of any specific quarter phase of the Moon will hereafter be refered to as the span of a lunar week. Note that each lunar week averages out to be about equal to seven and one-third days. The cycle of the lunar week is consequently a bit slower or longer than an ordinary week cycle of 7 days.

A time grid of lunar weeks can be shown to almost exactly overlay a time grid of solar years. In essence, based upon the spin and orbital phenomenon, the rate of the lunar-week cycle is easy to illustrate in cross-reference with the rate of the tropical year.

The cited interface of the tropical year with the reoccurrence of the lunar week is quite precise--to within the average limits of 0.00198 days/year.

The following chart then attempts to show that a time cycle of 50 tropical years can very closely be correlated or cross-referenced to a time grid comprised of specific lunar-week segments:

--------------------------------------------------- A JUBILEE CALENDAR OF LUNAR WEEKS ------------------------ ------------------------ Year 1 = 49 lunar weeks Year 8 = 49 lunar weeks Year 2 = 49 lunar weeks Year 9 = 49 lunar weeks Year 3 = 49 lunar weeks Year 10 = 49 lunar weeks Year 4 = 49 lunar weeks Year 11 = 49 lunar weeks Year 5 = 49 lunar weeks Year 12 = 49 lunar weeks Year 6 = 49 lunar weeks Year 13 = 49 lunar weeks Year 7 = 49 lunar weeks Year 14 = 49 lunar weeks At 7th Year: + 1 week At 7th Year: + 1 week ------------------------ ------------------------ Year 15 = 49 lunar weeks Year 22 = 49 lunar weeks Year 16 = 49 lunar weeks Year 23 = 49 lunar weeks Year 17 = 49 lunar weeks Year 24 = 49 lunar weeks Year 18 = 49 lunar weeks Year 25 = 49 lunar weeks Year 19 = 49 lunar weeks Year 26 = 49 lunar weeks Year 20 = 49 lunar weeks Year 27 = 49 lunar weeks Year 21 = 49 lunar weeks Year 28 = 49 lunar weeks At 7th Year: + 1 week At 7th Year: + 1 week ------------------------ ------------------------ Year 29 = 49 lunar weeks Year 36 = 49 lunar weeks Year 30 = 49 lunar weeks Year 37 = 49 lunar weeks Year 31 = 49 lunar weeks Year 38 = 49 lunar weeks Year 32 = 49 lunar weeks Year 39 = 49 lunar weeks Year 33 = 49 lunar weeks Year 40 = 49 lunar weeks Year 34 = 49 lunar weeks Year 41 = 49 lunar weeks Year 35 = 49 lunar weeks Year 42 = 49 lunar weeks At 7th Year: + 1 week At 7th Year: + 1 week ------------------------ ------------------------ Year 43 = 49 lunar weeks Year 44 = 49 lunar weeks Year 45 = 49 lunar weeks Year 46 = 49 lunar weeks Year 47 = 49 lunar weeks Year 48 = 49 lunar weeks Year 49 = 49 lunar weeks At 7th Year: + 1 week --------------------------- Year 50 = 49 lunar weeks

It should be clear that when the count of one lunar week each and every 3rd year (the X1 rate) is subtracted from out of a streaming count of lunar weeks (or lunar quarters), a jubilee calendar comprised of lunar weeks is the inherent result. Essentially, a streaming count of lunar weeks (or lunar quarters) can be used to precisely define each year of a 50-year cycle.

Note that each calendar year -- as diagrammed -- if is equal to 365.2442 days (on average) and this length compares very closely with the rate of the solar circle or year-- which completes in 365.2422 days.
The cited lunisolar cross-reference (a precise overlay) is based upon the modern rate of the lunar-quarter phase. It is here significant that ancient eclipse data indicates that the spin and orbital rates tend to vary by a tiny amount throughout time. Consequently, the cited time grid of lunar quarters may have once existed in perfect interface with a time grid of solar years. For additional information concerning the long-term accuracy and definition of the cited jubilee interface, refer to the online document entitled: 'Is There a Case for Created Time?'
It is here most remarkable that the track of a jubilee cycle of 7 sets of 7 years (and sometimes a 50th year) can be recited from ancient Israelite literature (including biblical). Some texts produced in the Second-Temple Era explicitly describe the rotation of the priestly courses in association with a jubilee schedule. When detailing the priestly rotation in association with a 49-year cycle, Scroll 4QOtot becomes rather explicit in describing the appearance of a lunar-cycle 'sign' (the 'ot', or plural 'otot') at the unending frequency of each third year. The source information that relates the early adherence to 7 sets of 7 years (and associated lunar-cycle reckoning) seems to mirror the possibility that Israel's priesthood possessed knowledge of the above cited jubilee interface. For additional information concerning the once adhered to count of 50 years, refer to the online publication: 'The Jubilee Cycle'.

The spin-orbital movements are synchronized

The spin and orbital movements can be interpreted to represent interrelated time design--as cited. This kind of interpretation seems more certain from the degree of synchronization by which the solar day returns in interface with the synodic period of the Moon.

It is here significant that the rotational phase of the Earth (the day rate) inherently interfaces or conjoins with the rate of the synodic revolution of the Moon. This conjoining reoccurs every 49 synodic cycles of the Moon. Essentially, when 7 sets of 7 lunar months (or 49 lunar months) have elapsed, the same rotational phase of the Earth comes into conjunction with a same phase of the Moon.

The following diagram attempts to more fully illustrate that a cycle of 7 lunar months (cycled 7 times) very closely interfaces with the rate of the rotation of the Earth:

THE INTERFACE OF Number of 49 SYNODIC MONTHS * Earth's Rotations __________________________ _________ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 206.71 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 413.43 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 620.14 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 826.86 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 1033.57 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 1240.28 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 1447.00 __________________________ _________ * - Earth's rotation aligns with 49 lunar months.
Note that 1447 days divided by the rate of the synodic-month cycle, or 29.53059 days, is equal to 49.0000 lunar months.

The cited synchronization of Earth's spin with 49 lunar periods is very close (almost exact). Of significance is that the stated interface can be recognized as fully perfect if only the lunar cycle elapsed in 29.53061 days (a tiny bit different from the modern rate of 29.53059 days). The possibility then is that the conjoining of these two cycles may either have once been fully perfect (as in medieval times when ice extended farther from the poles) or when (in the future) the spin-orbital configuration changes.

For pertinent information concerning the close to perfect closure of the rate of the rotation of the Earth with a seven-squared number of Moons (49 Moons), refer to 'Is There a Case for Created Time?'.

A systems view

The two previously presented sections have attempted to show that the Moon cycle does seem to intelligently interrelate both with the annual transit of the Sun (the solar-year rate) and also with the spin of the Earth (the solar-day rate).

Interrelated time design can additionally be interpreted from the peculiar rate by which the synodic month of 29.53059 days does exceed a whole day rate of 29 days.

An amount of difference is inherent between the rate of the synodic month (29.53059 days on the average) and a whole-day count of 29 days. The cited difference between the two rates averages out to be a little over half a day--or 0.53059 days. (Note that 29.53059 days minus 29 days is equal to 0.53059 days).

Based upon the indicated half-day count difference by which the synodic month exceeds 29 days, it follows that if the rate of the synodic month is always counted out in correspondence with a whole-day rate (29 days) then the difference of the stated half-day rate (0.53059 days per lunar month) would eventually accumulate or accrue to the sum of exactly 105 half days in every cycle of 8 solar years.

The indicated correspondence between cycles of the Earth, Moon, and Sun is remarkable in the regard that 105 half days in 8 years is all but perfectly equal to the rate of 0.53059 days per lunar month.

___________________________________ A DAY-TO-YEAR CORRESPONDENCE BASED UPON THE RATE OF THE SYNODIC MONTH ___________________________________ Year Number of Number of Number of Synodic Half Days Half Days Months as 29-Day that are Cycles Residual ------------- ---------- --------- 1 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 2 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 3 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 4 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 5 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 6 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 7 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 8 12.36827 717.35942 13.12496 ------------------------------------ Tot: 98.94613 5738.87539 104.99965
Note that 0.53059 days per lunar month--if extended for the number of months in 8 years or for 98.94613 lunar months--is just about exactly equal to the length of 105 half days.

The cited half-day difference (0.53059 days per synodic month) is of seeming significance in the regard that the number of days in each synodic revolution can systematically be scribed relative to always 29 days (as a rate of whole days). The residual rate of fractional days (0.53059 days per lunar month) can then routinely be intercalated according to a separate or a secondary rate of days. Because the stated secondary rate of days is inherently equal to 105 half days every 8 solar years then the occurrence of a periodic 30th day in the lunar-month cycle can be accounted for around a schedule that is formal and fixed.

Refer to the subsequent section for pertinent information concerning the significance of intercalating the 30th day of both the lunar month and the solar month.

Thus, the number of days in each synodic revolution of the Moon can be used to precisely scribe the limits of a cycle of 8 solar years (in average time).

A scribe of 29 days per lunar month and the additional scribe of 105 half days has an 8-year average that equals 2921.93769 days. (This 8-year average quite perfectly correspondends with the limits of 8 solar years--which is equivalent to 2921.93752 days).

The cited correspondence between the lunar period and the day cycle can be used to very precisely determine the limits of 8 solar years (on the average). In this modern era, the cited half day bounds with the epoch of each 8th year to within a difference of only 15 seconds (which is a difference of less than 2 seconds per year). The average annual result of the cited scribe is almost perfect. (Due to the tiny rate by which the spin of the Earth appears to be slowing down, the cited lunisolar correspondence can be predicted to have at one time been absolutely perfect. The time when a perfect alignment did exist can be predicted at only a few centuries ago.)
For additional information concerning the stated spin-phase interface, refer to the following online publication: 'Time Portals or Annual Gates'.

Time stations

An ancient astronomer left record of the year becoming "complete according to the station of the Moon, and the station of the Sun... ". This notation of 'time stations' seems significant in the regard that the length of each passing solar year can very effectively (almost perfectly) be measured and metered by simply counting solar days. In essence, the length of the solar year (365.24219 days) can almost EXACTLY be correlated to a fixed number of annual days. (This axiom is valid in the context of additionally counting days positioned eternally at Sun and Moon stations).

To be more specific about the definition of time stations, a day count of the tropical year is possible within the context of tracking only the following two time cycles:

  1. A cycle defined by the Moon.
  2. A cycle defined by the Sun.

The first of the two cited time cycles that must always be accounted for is equal to 7 lunar weeks. The revolution of a time span equal to 7 lunar weeks must eternally be time tracked--as follows:

------------------------------------ Moon Cycle of 7 Lunar Weeks ------------------------------------ Lunar quarter 1 (lunar week 1) Lunar quarter 2 (lunar week 2) Lunar quarter 3 (lunar week 3) Lunar quarter 4 (lunar week 4) Lunar quarter 5 (lunar week 5) Lunar quarter 6 (lunar week 6) Lunar quarter 7 (lunar week 7) ------------------------------------

The second of the two time cycles that must always be tracked is equal to the span of time occupied by 30 solar days. The revolution of a time span equal to 30 solar days must eternally be time tracked--as follows: 30 days . . . 30 days . . . 30 days . . . over and over and over.

Of significance here is that one of the best possible day-count models that can account for each passing tropical year requires only a running count of the two stated cycles (7 quarters by the Moon, and 30 days by the Sun).

The following diagram more specifically illustrates the feasibility of 'day counting' a span of time equal to the solar year. The current model only requires an accounting of the Moon and Sun cycles--as follows:

----------------------------------------- EARTH'S ROTATION CAN BE CORRELATED TO THE ANNUAL QUARTERS ----------------------------------------- Annual Corresponding Division Day Counts -------- ----------------------- Quarter 1 1 + 28 + 29 + 28 Quarter 2 1 + 29 + 28 + 29 Quarter 3 1 + 28 + 29 + 28 Quarter 4 1 + 29 + 28 + 29 ----------------------------------------- The cited calendar count of 346 days does inherently pace the return of each passing year as long as specific additional days are routinely intercalated--as follows: 1. At every Sun station (1 day). 2. At every Moon station (1 day). A scribe of 346 days paces 365.24232 days per year when Sun-Moon stations are skipped.

The above diagram attempts to show that--in pace with unique additionally counted days or time stations--each passing annual-quarter division can easily and effectively be metered.

Please take note here that an intercalation rate equal to 1 day per Sun Cycle and 1 day per Moon Cycle is equal to 19.24232 days per year. This then means that from year to year the seasonal turns can effectively be metered out in correspondence with a fixed count of days. Note that a calendar count of 346 days with intercalated days achieves an average solar-year rate of 365.24232 days.

Thus the average result of tracking days within the context of Sun and Moon cycles (in this modern era) is proven to be perfect from year-to-year within a difference of only 11.2 seconds! (The annual result of tracking celestial time stations can be recognized as fully or absolutely perfect only centuries before).

Refer to the following online publications for more complete information concerning the significance of tracking celestial time stations:
  1. Functional Time Design
  2. A Significant Circle of Sevens
  3. Significance of the Lunar Week

Day and year cycles

Other interpretations seem plausible in their indication of interrelated time design. One of these interpretations concerns the rate by which Earth's spin returns in interface with the annual transit of the Sun. The indicated day-to-year interface makes it possible to ultimately conclude that the solar-day unit is an element or a component of a time-tracking system that is intellegent in its design.

The essence of the stated interpretation of the solar day in interface with the solar year is that when Earth's spin (the solar-day rate) is accounted for in specific units of 10 days then certain arrangements of the 10-day cycles can quite exactly be correlated or cross-referenced to the epoch of each passing solar-year cycle. To be more specific, it is demonstrable that when the track of a specific cycle of 20 days is routinely performed then the rate of each passing solar year can effectively be cross-referenced or correlated to a fixed number of day cycles. Oddly enough, this is also true concerning the track of a specific cycle of 30 days, and this is also true concerning the track of a specific cycle of 40 days!

For additional information concerning a time track of 10-day cycles, refer to these online publications:
  1. Significance of 40 Days
  2. Tracking the Day-of-the-Sun
  3. A Count of 360 Days
  4. Looking at Ancient Astronomy

A functional time schedule

Significant to a study of interrelated time design is that the rate of the solar year and also the rate of the synodic month can both be normalized or represented by specific cycles of solar days--as previously has been cited.

For additional information about interfacing cycles of days, lunar weeks, and solar years, refer to the following online publications:
  1. Is There a Case for Created Time?
  2. About Time Design
  3. The Slowing Earth
  4. The Moon as a Time Meter
  5. A Significant Circle-of-Seven
  6. A Count of 360 Days
  7. The Ancient Reckoning of Time Portals
  8. Significance of the Lunar Week

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